Molecular Ecology Final Posters

I am very proud of the students from Bio-178 Molecular Ecology who presented their posters at an open event at Sacramento State University as part of the culmination of their capstone projects. These projects provide an important opportunity for the students to engage in research while investigating novel questions. This year Dr. Shannon Datwyler and I supervised eight group projects. Students investigated the following: phylogeography of ringtails in California; subspecies status and population structure of California voles in the San Francisco Bay Area; molecular ecology of arbuscular mycorrhiza; sturgeon population structure in California; phylogeography of Penstemon species; and progenitor species of a polyploidy Penstemon species.

Mammalogy Field Course

We were lucky enough to have our Mammalogy Field course this year at Quail Ridge Reserve. This beautiful site is covered in Chaparral and Oak woodland, and is located near Lake Berryessa in California’s coastal range.

The view south of base camp
The view south of base camp
Looking out over Lake Berryessa
Looking out over Lake Berryessa
Happy campers
Happy campers
Tent cabins
Tent cabins

The students got practical experience using noninvasive mammal monitoring techniques such as track plates, remote cameras, and radio tracking. The cameras picked up multiple gray foxes and black tailed deer. The track plates and bait worked very well to attract and detect gray foxes. At night groups of students were able to successfully locate three individual gay foxes using radio telemetry.

On the way to set up track plates
On the way to set up track plates
A young black-tailed deer buck
A young black-tailed deer buck
Gray fox
Gray fox
Gray fox
Gray fox
Success. Fox prints
Success. Fox prints
Dusky footed woodrat nest in an old tuck
Dusky footed woodrat nest in an old tuck
Madrone or manzanita tree
Madrone or manzanita tree
Found under a herp board
Found under a herp board
Taken by Davis Bui
Taken by Davis Bui